RePost……Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

The Hummingbird Moth, unlike most moths, is seen on clear, sunny days. Many people do confuse it with hummingbirds because of its coloration and how it moves.

Hummingbird Moths grow up to two inches long. They have an olive-green body with red bands across their abdomen. Tufts of hairs from the end of the abdomen look a lot like feathers. The wings of this moth are mostly clear, sometimes with some red near the body.

Adult sphinx moths are medium to large moths with wingspans ranging from about 1.25 inches to 4.75 inches.  The Carolina sphinx, whose larva is known as the tobacco hornworm, weighs only one to two grams, but it flaps its wings an astonishing 25 to 30 beats per second. Some sphinx moths have been clocked at speeds as high as 30 mph.

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Adult Hummingbird Moths feed on nectar from many different flowers, just like hummingbirds. Some of their favorites include: Japanese Honeysuckle, Red Clover, Highbush Blueberry, thistles, wild roses, and blackberries.

Hummingbird Moths use a long, thin, needle-like mouthpart to eat that can be seen in several images. It stays coiled up like a garden hose until it is time to use it. When the moth approaches a flower, it uncoils it and dips it deep into the flower where the nectar is.

Predators of Hummingbird Moths include birds, mantids, spiders, bats, and other moth- and caterpillar-eaters, although they probably get some protection from looking so much like hummingbirds.

Thank you for time & interest in my work and please visit the website www.naturewurks.com for additional images.

As always all your comments are welcomed and very much appreciated!

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